Michael Paradise Hire IT

 

According to the March 2015 LINE (Leading Indicators of National Employment) from the Society for Human Resource Management, recruiting difficulty had increased in both the manufacturing and services sectors in February 2015.

 What are organizations to do in order to stay competitive?

Focus on top notch recruiting efforts.

Is recruiting an art that deserves center stage in your business?

We all know it is.

The recruiting and staffing industry plays a direct role in the success of your business — the wrong hire wastes time and money in innumerable ways, from out-of pocket recruiting costs (accommodations, transportation) and on boarding costs (equipment, training), to disruption costs associated with lost work and opportunity costs associated with missed business, failure to hire other candidates, and miscommunications internally and with clients.

Finding the right candidate to fill a position is a process that begins in most cases before the position is even open: ideally, your recruiter will focus on getting to know your organization from the inside out to better understand your culture, and the culture of the specific group or team you’re hiring for. The balance of the team is important to create a functioning whole, and if your recruiter knows what makes your company or team tick, they can cut to the chase on candidate selection. A good recruiter will present you fewer candidate resumes, but ones that will be a better fit for the position.

One key component of making the right hire is having an appropriate job description and a good sense of expectations for your new employee. A good recruiter will ask challenging questions and probe deeply for hidden agendas when looking at a job description. Drafting an updated position description to address current and upcoming needs will ensure you find the appropriate candidate. Don’t use an “in the can” job description, or one pulled from a random website that “sounds like” what you’re looking for. You need to customize the job description to your exact needs, reviewed by HR for compliance and legal reasons if necessary, and utilizing the input of the professionals on the recruiting team.

One more point: your recruiter should be cognizant that their reputation is built on each and every placement and relationship they make — in other words, they should be focused on your needs, not theirs. If you sense that their business expansion is a priority over yours, or that they’re throwing a quantity of resumes at you rather than quality candidates, or their leadership isn’t actively engaged in your success, it may be time to reassess that relationship. Their inattention could ultimately spill into your company.

You have a lot riding on your business, and you need to know the people you hire feel the same responsibility. That means hiring a recruiter that knows the intricacies of your industry and the specific needs of your company.